Bonsai Garden Design and Security

Hello - I am new to the forum and to Bonsai, but eager to open another chapter on the gardening world.
My question is double-barrelled.
1- Where can I find discussion on fitting Bonsai display benches into an existing treed perennial garden. Are there do’s and don’ts of which I should be aware?
2- Which are of greater concern? 2-legged or 4-legged critters? I have observed that fish fertilizer can be an attractant for the 4-legged ones, but what about general security?

Thanks for your thoughts.

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Welcome!
Garden design is very individualistic, however if it incorporates Bonsai there are certain aspects that should be considered. Of prime concern is selecting locations for display that provide suitable sun or shade as required by the species. Next would be planning for water requirements based on species, stage of development and substrate used! Display benches or stands can also be designed for fewer problems from pests and proper viewing heights. Another consideration would be transfer of disease from nearby or overhanging landscape specimens. It is always beneficial to work with Bonsai species that are very suitable to your particular climate, thus making year round care much simpler in a set up display/garden.
As for the security aspect, over the most recent past, the two legged creatures have been more of a concern across North America.
Some suggestions in that regard would be the following:

  1. Located in an area not easily viewed from the street, or common access. Hedge, fence, some distance from public walkways.
  2. Secure or gated access to the property and a fenced property.
  3. Security cameras on entries and exit points as well as the overall site if within budget and desired. Accompanied by flood lamps on motion detector sensors.
  4. Most professional or public gardens secure their best tree’s and pots physically to the stand or bench by cable.
  5. For private gardens it is wise to be judicious about who visits and have extra help when large numbers of the public are invited!

It is unfortunate that such a beautiful enterprise such as Bonsai requires such considerations as above. The theft of valuable Bonsai is a very real occurrence in society today!

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The only item I’d wish to add to the excellent advice from Frank is for you to be careful who you speak to. It’s easy for us to want to talk to others of our hobby. If you will take the precaution of having your trees in a more private area, why would you undo that caution by speaking of your avocation to folks you don’t know well?
Besides, you’ll meet and come to know so many great people in our hobby, it will likely fill your social needs.

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Don,
I add Neem cake meal to my fertilizer mix (which includes fish, bone and alfalfa meals) about 1 pint to 5 gallons of mix. The Neem has really cut down on the ants, bugs and rodents. That rate slows down the Deer maybe a stronger rate would do better, as I cannot convince my wife we need a pet Mountain Lion.
Dave

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Thanks for your comment Dave. Neem meal products are certainly endorsed by the cannabis growers - and it only took me a page and 1/2 of reading to realize what site I was on! :laughing:

My deer comments are as follows: They are creatures of habit and they require an alternate route which is less trouble (less confusing, tastier, etc.) than their route through your property. This could mean directing them along a route away from specific areas on a larger property or completely treating a smaller inner city lot such as mine.
Research at an eastern USA university tested commercial deer repellants and discovered that a mix of 10-15% milk in water was more effective. It doesn’t hurt to add eucalyptus or lavender oil just to step it up. If you can get the fawns trained to an alternate route you have won 1/2 the battle.
In a previous garden I successfully grew tulips and roses with this solution, while directing the deer along a central lawn runway.
I recognize that I am currently in an area with a much lower deer population. I’m not sure how well this solution would work to divert the herd of 15-20 deer I drove through yesterday in a neighbouring community. :astonished:

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Don,
After loosing every azalea and rhododendron bud one February weekend in me 1 acre garden, I put up a one strand electric fence 30" high (set on a timer dusk to dawn). The deer were diverted and for years I had no more problems. This year the population has exploded, we saw 5 fawns at one time in my garden, IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DAY. It seems the fawns wandered under the fence so the adults jumped the fence. I am soon to up grade to a 3 strand 6 foot electric fence.
Thanks for your advice.
Dave

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