Cherry Surinam Design

Not long ago I acquired an abandoned tree from a local nursery. I believe it’s a Surinam Cherry. I don’t know it’s history or care (lack of). It sat abandoned with very little soil when I acquired it. I was drawn to the potential in the large powerful trunk. Brought it home and combed out a few of the roots and placed it into the same same nursery pot with potting soil. Found the porcelain panda bear shown in the pictures, deep into the root ball. Looking for design direction and care for the next season or two. It seems quite healthy with the exception of leaf spot that I can’t seem to get rid of. I’m thinking of potting it at an angle to get immediate movement from the large trunk. Some direction would be greatly appreciated.

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I would contact the nursery and try to find out what is affecting the leaves. I think you will have difficulty introducing movement to the lower portion of the trunk, it is pretty straight and thick for bending. Perhaps you can change direction with planting angle.
I would focus on getting the tree healthy first.
From a design perspective the only approach that comes to mind would be to remove the three trunks on the left of the first picture and retain the one that curves off to the right. This adds some movement to the trunk.

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Hello Frank,
Yes the idea is to create movement with planting angle. The idea is to remove the longest branch and keep the others for deadwood carving. The nursery where I bought it is out of business now. I need to get the leaf spot under control.

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I would try two things.
One: control water to ensure root ball is not staying too wet and refrain from wetting the foliage. Keep the tree in an area where good air movement is possible.
Two: try a broad range systemic fungicide such as Bonide Infuse granular.

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Not sure that i am qualified to respond but I do own a Surinam cherry. This is a fruiting tropical species the picture of the new growth looks healthy bronzy kind of translucent in color. As it gets older should be a very dark green. Yours is staying very bright or yellow over watering would be my best guess. They are used as shrub plants in south Florida and considered an invasive species. Will take a good cut back if healthy. I would hold off on that til it is responding better. Copper spray in January. Grows quite fast. I have a picture of one in my posts.this is based on my zone 9-b so you would have to adjust to where you are located.