Clearys 3336 DG Fungicide Cleary Chemical Fungus & Disease Control


#1

Hi Guys!

Did anyone ever use Clearys 3336 DG to control, prevent fungus and disease. What’s the best time of the year to use it or use it regularly? I have some California Junipers and Blackpines with root rot and I want to control it. Thanks.


(Jonas Dupuich) #2

Yes - I’ve used it before with good success, but not for root rot. The best time to use it is before the fungus is most active. For root rot, however, I’d look into the cause as it can often be fixed by better soil and good watering practices.


#3

Hi Jonas. I repot my blackpines this year with 1part of akadama, 1 part of pumice and 1 part of lava rock but root rot is still there. I only water when the soil is dry. What do you think about using hydrogen peroxide (35%) to fix root rot? Thanks


(Jonas Dupuich) #4

When you repotted, did you see evidence of the root rot? Typically rotten roots are cut back to healthy growth during repotting. Also, is there much old soil in the pot or did you replace it all when you repotted? Am curious what caused the root rot in the first place.

I haven’t tried the hydrogen peroxide approach - Zerotol is the closest bactericide/fungicide I’ve used. As for the 3336, the specimen label includes details about how much to apply and when for different fungi, though without lab analysis or obvious symptoms, it can be hard to diagnose which fungi are causing the rot.

Am also curious how established the tree is - are these mature trees with only a few bad roots or young trees with only few good roots? Depending on the overall health/age/maturity of the tree an emergency repot (out of season repotting) may be in order.


#5

When I repotted, I cut off the rotten roots and left 1/2 of old soil and my blackpines are old. The reason why I got root rot because I over water the trees.


(Jonas Dupuich) #6

Thanks for the info - root rot is tricky. If the trees are still in decent shape I’d likely use a systemic fungicide like the Cleary, wait a while (per instructions on label) and then try another fungicide. I’d also consider a soil drench with a contact fungicide. If the trees are pretty stressed I’d keep them under shade cloth and cut down on - or completely remove - the fertilizer.

If plenty of new roots show up in the new soil, I’d repot again this coming winter and remove the rest, or at least another section, of the old soil to ensure the drainage is as good as possible.

Do let us know how it goes!


#7

Thanks for your info Jonas.


(Paul Pashley) #8

Just a note that hydrogen peroxide should be used on plants at a 3% concentration so a dilution rate of 1:12 should be used if you get the 36% solution.

It’s interesting to hear the fizzing noise as the extra oxygen is released into the soil. It’s a great liquid to use on seedlings, especially my acers which are sometimes prone to stem rot.


(Jeremiah Lee ) #9

I’m currently using this, however it’s a bit too early to tell how it works. I plan to apply every three months. I will use this with spraying on occasion. I use to spray everything with chemical incecticide and fungicide every month and a half and bot use any systemic. However I plan to spray a lot less frequently now and primarily use systemics, but spray more with organics.