Deciduous tree in 2 season climate


(dave) #1

hello guys,

i want to ask about deciduos trees, perhaps any of you guys know about this issue i dealt with, what i’m really confuse is i live in jakarta, indonesia.
in my country there are only 2 season; dry and wet season.
dry: may-september and wet/rainy: october - april

i want to ask about what i have to do with the trees that usually kept in country that have 4 seasons like japan, usa.

i recently bought 2 trees from japan: peach blossom and cherry blossom.
now this trees are quite vigorous, leaves emerging in all branch.
i also add fertilizer.
and what i want to ask in details are:

  1. when its the time for the leaves to fall off(because theres no fall season in my country), do i need to cut the leaves and leaving stem or cut back to the branch?
  2. when to take off the fertilizer and when to put it again?
  3. what kind of fertilizer i must use? i use green king fertilizer now, with npk ratio: 6:5:2
  4. if i must cut the leaves, when is the best time? or waiting for the flower buds to emerge and cut the leaves?

thank you guys


(Jonas Dupuich) #2

I’d be interested to hear how deciduous trees are treated in Florida or Hawaii or other warm climates. Am also curious if Indonesia bonsai pros like Robert Steven have ideas.

Dave - are there any deciduous trees growing in the ground near where you live? Am curious if there are any examples in nature you can follow.

As for your questions:

  1. One way to approach the seasons is to let a couple of trees - maybe not bonsai - grow and see what happens for a year. If there is a natural pattern, maybe you can follow that.
  2. In general, deciduous trees produce new shoots after the dormant season and then slow down. When they slow down we start feeding moderately.
  3. Green King sounds like a good fertilizer for the trees.
  4. After the trees finish producing new shoots, maybe a few months after they start growing, the new shoots can be shortened. They are usually cutback again a few months later before they go dormant.

Of course, that’s what we do in temperate climates. If you can’t find advice for deciduous trees in a tropical climate, your best option is to experiment!