Prunus Mume " Matsubara Red" cutting

I have been experimenting with cuttings of prunus mume. This small one greeted me with flowers when i entered the greenhouse today. First time i have seen nicer flowers on this variety. Most of my cuttings are smaller or of differrent varietals. Love the color, shape and scent of this one, thought i would share the moment.

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My mistake posted Kobai " pink" first. Here are the Matsubara " Red" . Deeper color and smaller flowers.

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Just beautiful! Do they smell good too?

They do, my wife said they made the workshop smell wonderful! First time. LOL

The pink is incredibly happy, and the red is a great deep color. Kind of amazed the do so well from cutting!

They look beautiful and happy, both of them!

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Beautiful! Are those long spindly branches sacrifice branches?

Actually the photos above are of cuttings that are just developing! My focus at this point is to gain root structure and growth. I have wired some for movement prior to cutback eventually! Most of the growth from the trunk will be sacrifice for years to come.
For now i am just appreciating the flowers and amazed at the amount for such small beginning plants.

How do you root the Mume cuttings? I have an 8’ Matsubara " Red" in my landscape however I have had no luck with hardwood cuttings.

One major factor in successful cuttings is the source and age of cutting material. For difficult species mature plants are a poor choice. There is a much better chance with juvenile material that is pruned on a regular basis producing numerous new shoots.
I wish i had a higher success rate they are very difficult. I am still searching for a better method. But the method i am working with is primarily discussed in " Dirr" as hardwood cuttings after leaf fall.
I am using a home made propogation unit with heat mat, fan and humidity enclosure. Longer cuttings with three nodes ( 5-6 inch ). Seal the top and rooting gel on the bottom. Stratify for i month then plant in Andersen flat. Pumice screened for smaller particles, take out the fines. ( essentially what remains between the medium and small screen in a seive set)
The cuttings even after they root can fail so must be well established before disturbance.
I use a hydrogen peroxide spray to help control fungal issues during stratification and while in the propogation unit. The pumice is also treated prior to use and during use by drench method when watering. Even with all those precautions the success rate is about 15%. Here is a picture of the home made unit.

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Thanks, My copy of Dirr has pages falling out from excessive ware and tear. What has NOT worked for me is sand and peat or pine bark fines 1:1 with Rootone. Although I dip cuttings in fungicide before stratification I do not have a continuing fungicide rediment. I have been taking cuttings before bloom, stratifying until late winter and sticking without heat outdoors in an unheated cold frame, that is below ground level. This year I will try take cuttings after bloom (in NC zone 7/8 bloom has finished so this or next weekend) stratify for 1 month. pumice: peat 9:1 (which I use for Dawn Redwood cuttings). H2O2 and fungicide. Hormex 8. Stick in individual Anderson band pots in flats. Put in unheated hoop house that has 80 degree F bottom heat. Thanks for your advice, I will up my fungal protocol and reduce organics in the media…

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Sounds like a plan. The juvenility aspect is addressed page 28 to 30 in my copy. May be a newer edition ( 2nd ). The timing aspect as you mentioned is also important. Will be interested to hear your results.