Satsuki & Kurume Azaleas differences?

Could someone please tell me the real differences between Kurumes and Satsukis?
Some pictures would be great!
Thanks in advance

Unfortunately i do not have pictures of both types that will show the differences. The key differences are not always easy to see depending on the cultivars of the two types of Azalea.
Satsuki are developed from Rhododendron Indicum. Kurume are developed from two separate strains originally found in the mountains of japan. R.kiusianum and r.kaempferi.
By now the resulting hybrids can be very confusing and difficult to distinguish simply by looking. Satsuki strains tend to have smoother bark then Kurume. The satsuki grow first and flower later, whereas the kurume flower first and then grow. This is probably the easiest characteristic to observe. Satsuki are usually one flower per bud, Kurume has multiple flowers on a bud. Kurume tend to have larger wider leaves, grow longer shoots and sparser foliage. Satsuki tend to have narrower, pointy leaves.
Now having said that the lines become blurred with hybridization and it is not always easy to tell the origin of today’s hybrids and cultivars.

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Thanks a lot, Frank, very helpful.
I have a kurume tutunji that flowers all the time. It’s winter in the southern hemisphere and it keeps sending flowers. Definitely more than one bud per terminal, but its leaves are as small as the satsukis.
Now the real doubt; if it blooms first and them grow, does it mean I should repot it after the satsukis? beginning of the summer?

Well here is where my process may differ from yours and others caring for Azalea!
I repot Azalea in the early spring prior to bloom. Even though that interferes with the bloom i believe it is the best time for repotting Azalea. This period of time can give the best recovery from repotting if flowers are not the priority!
After the bloom is a period of strong growth to replenish the energy spent on blooming and i use this time for pruning and maintaining shape. I do like to remove the buds prior to bloom if my priority is developing the tree rather than maintaining and the goal is for stronger branching and thicker foliage.
So for me repotting is early spring before flowering regardless of the Azalea strain!

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